2.710 billeder af retro design og indretning

eichler in marinwood
eichler in marinwood
building Lab, inc.building Lab, inc.
Eichler in Marinwood - At the larger scale of the property existed a desire to soften and deepen the engagement between the house and the street frontage. As such, the landscaping palette consists of textures chosen for subtlety and granularity. Spaces are layered by way of planting, diaphanous fencing and lighting. The interior engages the front of the house by the insertion of a floor to ceiling glazing at the dining room. Jog-in path from street to house maintains a sense of privacy and sequential unveiling of interior/private spaces. This non-atrium model is invested with the best aspects of the iconic eichler configuration without compromise to the sense of order and orientation. photo: scott hargis
Atomic Ranch MCM Main House
Atomic Ranch MCM Main House
Breathe Design StudioBreathe Design Studio
Our Austin studio decided to go bold with this project by ensuring that each space had a unique identity in the Mid-Century Modern style bathroom, butler's pantry, and mudroom. We covered the bathroom walls and flooring with stylish beige and yellow tile that was cleverly installed to look like two different patterns. The mint cabinet and pink vanity reflect the mid-century color palette. The stylish knobs and fittings add an extra splash of fun to the bathroom. The butler's pantry is located right behind the kitchen and serves multiple functions like storage, a study area, and a bar. We went with a moody blue color for the cabinets and included a raw wood open shelf to give depth and warmth to the space. We went with some gorgeous artistic tiles that create a bold, intriguing look in the space. In the mudroom, we used siding materials to create a shiplap effect to create warmth and texture – a homage to the classic Mid-Century Modern design. We used the same blue from the butler's pantry to create a cohesive effect. The large mint cabinets add a lighter touch to the space. --- Project designed by the Atomic Ranch featured modern designers at Breathe Design Studio. From their Austin design studio, they serve an eclectic and accomplished nationwide clientele including in Palm Springs, LA, and the San Francisco Bay Area. For more about Breathe Design Studio, see here: https://www.breathedesignstudio.com/ To learn more about this project, see here: https://www.breathedesignstudio.com/atomic-ranch
Less Is More.....Unless It's A Bore
Less Is More.....Unless It's A Bore
Hursthouse Landscape Architects and ContractorsHursthouse Landscape Architects and Contractors
Patterned bluestone, board-on-board concrete and seasonal containers establish strength of line in the front landscape design. Plants are subordinate components of the design and just emerging from their winter dormancy.
Belvidere place
Belvidere place
Portland building and remodelingPortland building and remodeling
Outdoor deck off the dining/kitchen area
Mid-Century Modern Redo
Mid-Century Modern Redo
Kristin Petro Interiors, Inc.Kristin Petro Interiors, Inc.
For more photos of this project, please visit our website at www.kristinpetro.com. For information, contact us at info@kristinpetro.com. Photographer: Cynthia Lynn Photography
Appalachain "Tree" House | The Eagles Nest
Appalachain "Tree" House | The Eagles Nest
EdgewoodEdgewood
Live Outside. Edgewood Log Homes. Sanctuary Home Line.
Mequon Mid Century Modern
Mequon Mid Century Modern
JFK Design-Build, LLCJFK Design-Build, LLC
2nd bar area for this home. Located as part of their foyer for entertaining purposes.
Mid Century Modern Contemporary design
Mid Century Modern Contemporary design
Cabinets and Beyond Design StudioCabinets and Beyond Design Studio
Mid Century Modern Contemporary design. White quartersawn veneer oak cabinets and white paint Crystal Cabinets
Park Slope Modern Row House
Park Slope Modern Row House
The Brooklyn StudioThe Brooklyn Studio
This residence was a complete gut renovation of a 4-story row house in Park Slope, and included a new rear extension and penthouse addition. The owners wished to create a warm, family home using a modern language that would act as a clean canvas to feature rich textiles and items from their world travels. As with most Brooklyn row houses, the existing house suffered from a lack of natural light and connection to exterior spaces, an issue that Principal Brendan Coburn is acutely aware of from his experience re-imagining historic structures in the New York area. The resulting architecture is designed around moments featuring natural light and views to the exterior, of both the private garden and the sky, throughout the house, and a stripped-down language of detailing and finishes allows for the concept of the modern-natural to shine. Upon entering the home, the kitchen and dining space draw you in with views beyond through the large glazed opening at the rear of the house. An extension was built to allow for a large sunken living room that provides a family gathering space connected to the kitchen and dining room, but remains distinctly separate, with a strong visual connection to the rear garden. The open sculptural stair tower was designed to function like that of a traditional row house stair, but with a smaller footprint. By extending it up past the original roof level into the new penthouse, the stair becomes an atmospheric shaft for the spaces surrounding the core. All types of weather – sunshine, rain, lightning, can be sensed throughout the home through this unifying vertical environment. The stair space also strives to foster family communication, making open living spaces visible between floors. At the upper-most level, a free-form bench sits suspended over the stair, just by the new roof deck, which provides at-ease entertaining. Oak was used throughout the home as a unifying material element. As one travels upwards within the house, the oak finishes are bleached to further degrees as a nod to how light enters the home. The owners worked with CWB to add their own personality to the project. The meter of a white oak and blackened steel stair screen was designed by the family to read “I love you” in Morse Code, and tile was selected throughout to reference places that hold special significance to the family. To support the owners’ comfort, the architectural design engages passive house technologies to reduce energy use, while increasing air quality within the home – a strategy which aims to respect the environment while providing a refuge from the harsh elements of urban living. This project was published by Wendy Goodman as her Space of the Week, part of New York Magazine’s Design Hunting on The Cut. Photography by Kevin Kunstadt

2.710 billeder af retro design og indretning

1
Danmark
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